Things Parents Need to Know

Parents today face the daunting task of juggling work and entertainment with their children's activities. When a child comes home and asks to take Taekwon-Do lessons, parents have to fit them into an already busy schedule filled with little league, soccer, basketball, volleyball, hockey, drama class, music lessons, gymnastics, and dance lessons. And because parents generally develop their perception of Taekwon-Do from action movies like Mortal Kombat and Blade, video games like Street Fighter, and television series such as Martial Law, they might be reluctant to enroll their child in such a violent activity.

 

More than any other extracurricular, however, Taekwon-Do focuses on the character development of a child in a positive and uplifting manner. Unfortunately, today’s television shows that show martial art fighting action do not illustrate the positive impact that Taekwon-Do can have in the life of a child. While training in Taekwon-Do teaches children to fight better—to hit, punch and kick well—there is much more to martial arts. The following are some FAQs in order to better help parents understand the benefits of training in Taekwon-Do.

 

There are at least three different categories of Taekwon-Do training, they are: traditional training, sport training, and eclectic training.

  • Traditional training includes learning the time-honored lessons, using the ancient order of learning each activity, and understanding and obeying the dojang hierarchy.  In traditional training, the focus is on each individual improving and growing from within. Parents quickly will see in their child obvious improvements from traditional training such as increased confidence, self-control and respect.

  • In sport training, much of the same information is learned, but students are taught to spar earlier in class. There is less emphasis on forms, stances and self-defense practice and the win/lose mentality is emphasized. The focus in sport training is to become a better fighter.

  • In eclectic style training, diversity is inspired. Eclectic training uses a training curriculum based on one or several individual experiences, often mixing a variety of martial arts styles. The focus in eclectic training is on becoming a better fighter rather than a better person.

A THOUGHT TO REFLECT / UNA REFLEXIÓN

URGENT FOR PARENTS WHO DEDICATE SO MUCH

TIME TO SPORT YOUR CHILDREN

"Shared on the Whatapp social network by a father who, like me, pays for his son"

 

Someone asked me:

Why spend money and time for your child to enter tennis, karate, volleyball, soccer, basketball or another sport?

I replied:

Well, I have a confession to do: I don't pay because my son trains and plays. Do you know what I’m paying? 

I pay because my son  learns to be disciplined ; to learns to take care of his body and mind; to learn to work with others and be a good teammate; learn to deal with disappointment when you don't get what you expected, but he know that he have to work harder; to learn to achieve your goals; to understand that it takes hours and hours of hard work and training to get a championship, and that success doesn't happen overnight; for the opportunity my son will have to make friends for life; to be  on the playing field and not in front of the television; for those moments when my son comes back so tired that he just wants to get some rest and he doesn't even think about spending time lazy or doing bad things; for all the teachings that the bearing gives him: "Responsibility, humility, dedication, friendship, coexistence, among others"

I could go on, but to be brief; I don't pay for the practices, I pay for the opportunities to develop attributes and skills that will be very useful to the lake of your life and give you the opportunity to value life,

FROM WHAT I HAVE SEEN HAST TODAY…. I THINK THIS IS MY BEST INVESTMENT.

URGENTE PARA LOS PADRES QUE DEDICAN TANTO TIEMPO AL DEPORTE DE SUS HIJOS

“Compartido en la red social Whatapp por un padre que, como yo, paga por su hijo”

 

Alguien Me pregunto:

Porque gastar dinero y tiempo para que tu hijo entre tenis, ¿karate vóley, futbol, baloncesto u otro deporte?

Le respondí:

Bueno, tengo una confesión que hacer: yo no pago porque mi hijo entrene y juegue.  ¿Sabes que estoy pagando?

Pago para que mi hijo aprenda a ser disciplinado: para que aprenda a cuidar su cuerpo y su mente; para que aprenda a trabajar con los demás y sea un buen compañero de equipo; para que aprenda a lidiar con la decepción cuando no obtiene lo que esperaba, pero sabe que hay que trabajar mas duro; para que aprenda a alcanzar sus objetivos; para que entienda que tomas horas y horas de trabajo duro y entrenamiento obtener un campeonato, y que el éxito no ocurre de la noche a la mañana; por la oportunidad que tendrá mi hijo de hacer amistades para toda la vida; para que este sobre el campo de juego y no frente al televisor; por esos momentos en que mi hijo vuelve tan cansado que solo quiere llegar descansar y no piensa ni tiempo de andar de vago o en cosas malas; por todas las enseñanzas que el de porte le da: “Responsabilidad, humildad, entrega, amistad, convivencia, entre otros”

Podría seguir, pero para ser breve; no pago por las practicas, pago por las oportunidades de desarrollar atributos y habilidades que le será muy útiles a lo lago de su vida y darle la oportunidad de valorar la vida,

POR LO QUE HE VISTO HAST HOY…. CREO QUE ES MI MEJOR INVERSION.